THE WORLD DELTA DATABASE

THE COLORADO DELTA

 

Delta ID    # 62.


Contributed by Huh et al, 2004.

Colorado River Delta, Mexico, North America

LOCATION LAT. 3144N, LONG. 11421W

LANDMASS DRAINED MEXICO, NORTH AMERICA

BASIN OF DEPOSITION GULF OF CALIFORNIA

CLIMATE DESERT (BWh)

AIR TEMP RANGE 12C 32C,

TIDAL AMPLITUDE 7-9 M

TYPE SEMIDIURNAL

DISCHARGE SEDIMENT 135X106 TONS/YR

ID 7038038000231450, PATH 38 ROW 38

 

IMAGE ACQUIRED NOVEMBER 10, 2002


Contributed by Professor George F. Hart, LSU

Delta type:

Image ID: ISS009, Roll  E Frame: 9839

Acquired: June 2nd., 2004.

Data sets

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Geo-referenced files

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Publications

Reports

Description

The Colorado River Delta was initiated about 3 million ybp and is the largest watershed in the southwestern USA. The delta is about 140 km long but excessive inland water use is diminishing its size yearly. The  Hoover (1935) and Glen Canyon (1964) dams both impound water.

The arid climate creates extensive white salt flats to the southeast of the Cienega (wetland) de Santa Clara.  These wetland are brackish marshes and are a stopover location for migratory Pacific shore birds. They are currently surviving because of groundwater pumping into the marsh area from the southwestern USA. The Isla Montague is at the entrance to the Gulf of California. 

62-i02: In the image the gray-brown linear streaks extending southeast from Isla Montague into the Gulf are floodplain sediments mobilized by tidal surges and wave action rather than fluvial processes. Dark green areas bordering the channel, shoreline, and Isla Montague are riparian and estuarine vegetation.   Prior to impoundment of water from upstream dams the delta provided habitat for a wide variety of species including shrimp, corvina fish, and vaquita porpoise. Replacement of water into the delta from groundwater and upstream releases have helped to revive some of the preexisting habitat. This reinvigorated habitat also supports a local ecotourism industry within the delta region. Continuing drought conditions affecting the southwestern USA may decrease water delivery to the delta with significant impacts on both the ecologic and economic health of the region [JSC].